Empire cookie, or as they call it in Winnipeg - Imperial Cookie - Elegant Shortbread Sandwich Cookie with Raspberry Jam

Empire cookie, or as they call it in Winnipeg - Imperial Cookie - Elegant Shortbread Sandwich Cookie with Raspberry Jam

Imperial Cookie is a sandwich cookie made out of light and fluffy shortbread, with raspberry jam in the middle, sugary white glaze on top and a little red dot in the middle.

Empire biscuit is a traditional Scottish dessert which is also popular in other European countries such as Germany, Belgium, Ireland and happens to be a hugely iconic staple of Winnipeg. Seriously, if you have ever been to Winnipeg, you must’ve noticed these gorgeous cookies in almost every coffee shop. They are literally everywhere and rightfully so, because they are absolutely delicious!

So, these elegant and delicate cookies are actually quite easy to make. And trust me, they will disappear quickly anywhere you bring them! So let’s get cooking!

Category

This makes about 12 cookies, if using 2" cookie cutter. With 4" cookie cutter you are only looking at 4-5 Giant cookies.

imperial cookies

Yields12 Servings

 ½ cup butter, room temp
 ½ cup white sugar
 1 egg
 1 tsp vanilla
 2 cups cake flour, bleached
 1 tsp baking powder
 ½ tsp kosher salt (half as much if using fine table salt)
 ½ cup raspberry jam
 candied cherries for topping, optional
For the icing:
 1 cup icing sugar, sifted
 ¼ tsp almond extract
 1 tbsp hot water or milk (may need less or more to adjust the consistency)

1

Combine butter, sugar, baking powder and salt in a bowl of the stand mixer. Mix on low to prevent the flour from going all over the place. When combined, increase the speed to high and beat until light and fluffy, around 5 minutes.

2

Decrease the speed to medium and beat in the egg and vanilla, stopping to scrape the sides of your bowl with a rubber spatula.

3

Decrease the speed to low and add cake flour in 3-4 additions. Mixing only long enough until a soft dough is formed. Again, ensure to scrape up the bowl with your spatula.

4

Shape the dough into a disc, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 2 hours. This will allow for the gluten in flour to relax and make your cookie softer, as well as easier to roll, as well as hydrate the flour and firm up the butter.

5

After two hours, take out of the fridge. Gently knead the dough with your fingers just to soften it. Alternatively gently press down the sides of the dough with your rolling pin while rotating the disk. Roll out the dough to about 1/4 inch thickness on a floured surface. You can even roll these cookies out on floured piece of parchment paper to prevent sticking. Cut out the cookies using a cookie cutter. Feel free to use 2" round cutter. But traditionally Imperial cookies are cut out with Terrace cookie cutters (as in my picture.) I used 3" terrace cookie cutter.

6

Place cookies on parchment lined baking sheets. Ensure to leave 3/4" spaces between cookies to account for spreading. Bake in preheated oven until puffed, pale and just beginning to turn slightly golden at the edges, about ten minutes. Don't overbake these and remember they will harden as they cool. Cool directly on the baking sheets. Ensure the cookies are completely cool before proceeding to the next step.

7

While your cookies are cooling, make the icing by combining all of the ingredients to achieve spreadable consistency. Place your raspberry jam in a bowl and stir to make it easier to spread.

8

When ready to assemble, spread some raspberry jam on one of the cookies and sandwich with another cookie. Spread the icing on top. Classically, these are topped with a candied cherry, but that's totally optional.

Ingredients

 ½ cup butter, room temp
 ½ cup white sugar
 1 egg
 1 tsp vanilla
 2 cups cake flour, bleached
 1 tsp baking powder
 ½ tsp kosher salt (half as much if using fine table salt)
 ½ cup raspberry jam
 candied cherries for topping, optional
For the icing:
 1 cup icing sugar, sifted
 ¼ tsp almond extract
 1 tbsp hot water or milk (may need less or more to adjust the consistency)

Directions

1

Combine butter, sugar, baking powder and salt in a bowl of the stand mixer. Mix on low to prevent the flour from going all over the place. When combined, increase the speed to high and beat until light and fluffy, around 5 minutes.

2

Decrease the speed to medium and beat in the egg and vanilla, stopping to scrape the sides of your bowl with a rubber spatula.

3

Decrease the speed to low and add cake flour in 3-4 additions. Mixing only long enough until a soft dough is formed. Again, ensure to scrape up the bowl with your spatula.

4

Shape the dough into a disc, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 2 hours. This will allow for the gluten in flour to relax and make your cookie softer, as well as easier to roll, as well as hydrate the flour and firm up the butter.

5

After two hours, take out of the fridge. Gently knead the dough with your fingers just to soften it. Alternatively gently press down the sides of the dough with your rolling pin while rotating the disk. Roll out the dough to about 1/4 inch thickness on a floured surface. You can even roll these cookies out on floured piece of parchment paper to prevent sticking. Cut out the cookies using a cookie cutter. Feel free to use 2" round cutter. But traditionally Imperial cookies are cut out with Terrace cookie cutters (as in my picture.) I used 3" terrace cookie cutter.

6

Place cookies on parchment lined baking sheets. Ensure to leave 3/4" spaces between cookies to account for spreading. Bake in preheated oven until puffed, pale and just beginning to turn slightly golden at the edges, about ten minutes. Don't overbake these and remember they will harden as they cool. Cool directly on the baking sheets. Ensure the cookies are completely cool before proceeding to the next step.

7

While your cookies are cooling, make the icing by combining all of the ingredients to achieve spreadable consistency. Place your raspberry jam in a bowl and stir to make it easier to spread.

8

When ready to assemble, spread some raspberry jam on one of the cookies and sandwich with another cookie. Spread the icing on top. Classically, these are topped with a candied cherry, but that's totally optional.

Imperial Cookie

3 Comments
  1. can you tell me what temp to bake the cookies. not listed in recipe

  2. Doesn’t say the temp you should be baking these at, or an approximate time they should be in the oven… that’s a little frustrating.

  3. Not sure if I’m missing it but not seeing where it says what temperate to bake the cookies at?

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